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The Saracens High School

Subject Areas

 Art

Subject Lead: Miss Frankham

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

All pupils study Art and Design at KS3. Throughout their time studying this subject the curriculum has been created to inspire and develop pupils’ individual creativity. Pupils will have the opportunity to work with a range of different mediums and techniques to build upon in this skills based subject.

The curriculum has been designed to equip pupils with the knowledge and skills needed to progress on to GCSE. As pupils progress they will think more critically and creatively to develop a more rigorous understanding of Art and Design. The Art department have a big emphasis in supporting pupils to find their own creative style. This can include mediums within fine art, graphic communication, photography and textiles. Art is a truly subjective subject and we encourage pupils to express their own creativity, opinions and views within their outcomes. Pupils are encouraged to take creative risks, and explore and develop ideas in order to create a creative body of work. This is an essential life skill as well as teaching pupils how to look at things aesthetically and develop technical knowledge and skills.

Cultural Capital and Extra-Curricular Opportunities

The art curriculum has been designed to educate pupils on how the subject reflects and shapes our history as well as contributing to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation. This is embedded throughout trips and different schemes of learning in both KS3 and KS4 where pupils research into different artists, cultures, history and social issues. 

All pupils are encouraged to visit art galleries and museums to extend their learning. The Art department also plan opportunities for pupils in all years to gain new experiences and further develop their creative skills by attending trips to art galleries and by taking part in our enrichment curriculum. We run a weekly Arts Club after school, whilst also allowing pupils to make use of our ‘open house’ policy during lunchtimes, during which time pupils can use the facilities and develop their imagination. Each academic year the school also hold an ‘Arts Week’ where all pupils are able to participate and get involved in a variety of projects and activities.

Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.’  Pablo Picasso. 

KS3

The KS3 schemes of learning are very skills focused to enable pupils to learn the skills needed to take forward into GCSE. Supporting pupils in finding their own creative style is an essential part of the curriculum. Pupils will use a range of media such as paint, pencil, clay, printing, digital media and photography and use these to investigate with different techniques to record, observe and explore ideas within a portfolio of work. Pupils will analyse and evaluate their work as well as the work of others from range of periods. Pupils will also look at different cultural influences to build a greater cultural awareness and enhance pupils outcomes.

To support pupils choosing their GCSEs the department organise assemblies, talks and workshops to build a deeper understanding of the relevance art; how it fits into the world and career prospects the subject can offer. In the UK, the creative industries are one of the leading industries and contribute a great deal the UK economy. 

(1 double lesson a week for 12/13 weeks, on rotation with Food and DT)

 

KS4

At KS4 pupils can choose to study GCSE Art and Design (AQA 8201). The course will provide opportunities for pupils to develop their creative style through mediums such as Fine Art, Graphic Communication, 3D Art, Photography and Textiles over a series of three lessons a week. The curriculum has been designed to support pupils on their journey and to become independent artists, developing skills and techniques learnt in KS3. Pupils will be assessed on the GCSE assessment objectives and understand how to undertake sustained projects that links to a theme as well as looking at a variety of artist, craftspeople and designers to inspire and inform their outcomes. Pupils will build a portfolio of work that shows a clear way of thinking and creative process.

Throughout KS4 pupils will be encouraged to work at a bigger scale, going from A4 sketchbooks in KS3 to A3 sketchbooks in year 9 and some may progress on to A2 sheets in years 10 and 11. Pupils will have one to one creative review sessions and respond to constructive criticism to enable the development of their outcomes. Pupils will also start to form favoured mediums and experiment with these further within their projects. This will therefore enable pupils to become more independent throughout the 3 years to undertake their GCSE.

(3 lessons a week)

 

KS4 ASSESSMENT

Component one: Coursework (60% of final mark) A portfolio of work that will contain a series of extended projects that respond to a theme or starting point. This will be concluded by a final outcome.

Component Two: Exam (40% of final mark) Pupils will create a response to an externally set paper. Pupils will have a limited number of weeks to research their theme and develop ideas and thoughts that relate. This will take the form of a portfolio of work containing primary research, artist connections and exploration. This will be followed by a 10-hour practical exam where pupils create a final piece to finish and bring their project to an end.

Pupils are assessed using the AQA GCSE Assessment Objectives (AO's) throughout KS4. Pupils will be able to keep track of their current working level through their GCSE booklet and use feedback given to develop and progress within their work.

AO1: Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.

AO2: Refine work by exploring ideas, experimenting with media, materials, techniques and processes.

AO3: Record ideas and observations relevant to intentions as work progresses.

AO4: Present a final piece of work that presents a personal and meaningful response

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

  • The Fourth Plinth Schools Awards
  • Afterschool Arts Club
  • Lunchtime open house policy
  • SHS Arts Festival
  • School trips to art galleries and museums

 

LEARNING RESOURCES

Google classroom is used throughout as a hub for resources. Articles, websites, videos and general art inspiration is posted for pupils to help enrich their art knowledge. Other general websites include: 

https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/subjects/z6f3cdm

http://www.artyfactory.com/art_appreciation/visual-elements/visual-elements.html

 Computer Science 

Subject Lead – Ms Anwar

The Computer Science is an engaging and practical subject, which encourages creativity and problem solving. Pupils will develop their understanding and application of the core concepts in computer science. Pupils analyse problems in computational terms and devise creative solutions by designing, writing, testing and evaluating programs.

KS3

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Year 7

E-Safety and Podcasting

Algorithms and Programming

Programming and Photoshop

Year 8

 

E-Safety and HTML

 

Networks

Data Representation

 

KS4

At KS4 pupils can choose to study GCSE Computer Science (OCR J277) as one of their options. This qualification will enable pupils to develop:

  • Valuable thinking and programming skills that are extremely attractive in the modern workplace
  • A deep understanding of computational thinking and how to apply it through a chosen programming language.

Year 9 begins with a unit focused on systems architecture, memory and storage. Then in term 2 we look at Data Representation and the Ethical, Legal and Cultural Impacts of digital technology. Below are all the topics that we will study during KS4.

Paper 1 Topics

• 1.1 Systems architecture

• 1.2 Memory and storage

• 1.3 Computer networks, connections and protocols

• 1.4 Network security

• 1.5 Systems software

• 1.6 Ethical, legal, cultural and environmental impacts of digital technology

Paper 2 Topics

• 2.1 Algorithms

• 2.2 Programming fundamentals

• 2.3 Producing robust programs

• 2.4 Boolean logic

• 2.5 Programming languages and Integrated Development Environments

 

 DT & Food Tech

 Curriculum Lead: Mrs Cenci

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

The Design and Technology and Food technology curriculums have been developed in a way which provides pupils with opportunities to develop their skills alongside combining their knowledge and understanding in order to create innovative products.

KS3

Pupils in Year 7 and in Year 8 have one lesson of Design and Technology a week. The schemes of learning cover a range of skills in order to support and build on pupil’s knowledge.

YEAR 7

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Unit title and Learning objectives

Mexican Day of Dead Textiles w. electronics.

Sustainability

Developing practical skills Nutrition, hygiene, safety

Building on Practical skills

Nutrition, hygiene, safety

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  • Design for self
  • Design techniques
  • Other cultures
  • Textile practical;
  • Design, pattern cutting, sewing techniques. 
  • Electronic component’s
  • Evaluation
  • 6 R’s
  • Plastics
  • Acrylic Egg Cup
  • Safe use of tools
  • Cutting, shaping, forming acrylic
  • Practical diary
  • 2D Design Software
  • Hygienic practices Safe use of equipment.
  • Sensory analysis
  • Practical skills :
  • Knife skills
  • Weighing and measuring
  • Rubbing in method
  • Creaming method
  • Melting method
  • Roux sauces
  • Basic nutrition
  • Build on practical skills and apply knowledge of nutrition.
  • Practical skills :
  • Rubbing in method
  • Rolling
  • Cutting
  • Baking
  • Testing against a specification
  • Following a recipe
  • Macro-nutrients Micro-nutrients Healthy diet

YEAR 8

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Plywood clock

Real world problems; City in the Ocean. Electronics

Developing scientific skills and extending practical skills

Developing scientific skills and extending practical skills

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  • Designing for others
  • Iterative design
  • Design movement’s
  • Drawing techniques
  • Wood types 
  • Safe use of wood tools 
  • Cutting, shaping, finishing
  • Evaluation


  • Team work
  • Concept development 
  • Material testing
  • Sustainability
  • Electronics recap
  • Soldering
  • Solar Power
  • Recap on health and safety
  • Bacteria,cross contamination
  • Recap on Macro and micro nutrients
  • Practical skills:
  • Using the hob
  • Fine knife skills
  • Sweating
  • Braising
  • Pastry making, rolling, shaping, glazing
  • Modifying recipes
  • Function of
  • ingredients
  • Vegetarians
  • Scientific principles of yeast based products.
  • Analysis of yeast products
  • Practical skills:
  • Breadmaking
  • Composite meals
  • Fine knife skills
  • Reducing
  • Pastry making
  • Independent work
  • Alternative proteins
  • Food provenance
  • Fairtrade

KS4

At KS4 pupils can choose to study GCSE Design and Technology (AQA 8552) as one of their options. It is a mixture of theory and practical work building on the skills learnt during KS3. They will be creating their own projects from the Design Briefs given to them. They will develop their problem solving skills and become creative and proficient in their choice of materials. They will use hand tools, and a range of machines of both traditional and contemporary design; including pillar drills, vacuum formers, 3D printers, laser cutters and CNC lathes.

Assessment

50% is a written exam

50% is a portfolio of work and a final prototype based on one of three exam board criteria. They will spend 30-35 hours on this assessment over a 6 month period.

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition (Eduqas C560P1) is another subject that the pupils can choose to study in KS4. This course will equip pupils with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and heathy eating. It enables them to make informed decisions about food and nutrition to be able to feed themselves and other affordably and nutritiously, now and later in life.

Assessment

50% is Principles of Food Preparation and Nutrition written exam

50% is Food Preparation and Nutrition in Action, which includes;

  • Assessment 1:The Food Investigation Assessment. A scientific food investigation which will assess knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to scientific principles underlying the preparation and cooking of food.
  • Assessment 2:The Food Preparation Assessment. Prepare, cook and present a menu which assesses the learner’s knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking and presentation of food.

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

  • Afterschool Textiles Club during textiles projects
  • Visit to RAF Museum  
  • STEM day at Watford Grammar for Boys

 LEARNING RESOURCES

 Drama

Subject Lead: Ms Nicoll

Drama aims to teach pupils the value of drama as an art form with intellectual discipline. It is equally important to promote the social skills drama allows pupils to encompass which are transferable skills for life and across their educational careers. Drama is also a powerful vehicle for the understanding of spiritual, moral, social and cultural responsibility.

At times KS3 Drama will be used to mirror and support the English Curriculum in order to promote literacy and oracy.

KS3

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Year 7

The Terrible Fate of Humpty Dumpty

Romeo and Juliet

The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas

Speeches and Monologues

 

Year 8

Sparkleshark

 

7 Deadly Sins

Noughts and Crosses

 

Of Mice and Men

KS4

At KS4 pupils can choose to study GCSE Drama (Edexcel 1DR0) as one of their options.

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

Introducing drama

National Theatre Connections Project

Face the play by Benjamin Zephaniah

Devising a play, performed at the Barbican

Theatre Maters in Practice (An Inspector Calls)

Text in Performance

Theatres Makers in Practice (written exam preparation)

Assessment

  • Component 1: Devising (40% of final grade). Performance (/15) and a portfolio (/ 45)
  • Component 2: Text in Performance (20% of final grade) External examiner. Performance (/48)
  • Component 3: Theatre Makers in Practise (40% of final grade). Summer GCSE written exam (/60)

 English

Curriculum Lead: Miss Chilton

 CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Through the English curriculum at Saracens High School, pupils are provided with the opportunity to study a variety of texts, genres as well as authors. From the Medieval Canterbury Tales, through to the modern day Gothic Fiction text, Twilight, our English curriculum will enable pupils to develop an appreciation of, not just many authors’ works, but also the historical context in which these authors were writing. At Saracens, we indeed study, analyse and examine texts which bring moral and social issues to light, such as The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas and Of Mice and Men, allowing for many mature, rich and thought-provoking classroom discussions. Grammar and punctuation is taught explicitly in Writing lessons and pupils will also learn crucial skills in these lessons, such as letter writing and crafting short pieces of fiction. In all of our English lessons, there are ample opportunities for pupils to practice their Speaking and Listening skills too, enabling Saracens’ pupils to not only became proficient writers and readers but also highly articulate young individuals.

KS3

Pupils in Year 7 and in Year 8 have five fifty minute lessons of English a week. The Key Stage 3 schemes of learning below outline the topics studied each year as well as the key skills taught in every unit, which pupils will then be assessed on at the end of these units.

YEAR 7 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Unit title and Key Skills

Biographies and Autobiographies

Advertising

Poetry

The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas

AQA KS3 Language Paper 1 + Pop Test

Speech Writing

Reading

  • Inference
  • Retrieval of evidence
  •  

 

Reading

  • Inference for language  and presentation
  • Retrieval of evidence
  • Close language analysis
  • Effect on reader

Reading

  • Inference
  • Close language
  • analysis
  • Effect on reader
  • Author
      intentions
  •  

Reading

  • Inference
  • Retrieval of evidence
  • Close language
      analysis
  • Effect on reader
  • Extended analysis
  • Author      
      intentions

Reading

  • Inference
  • Retrieval of evidence
  • Subject Terminology
  • Close language analysis
  • Effect on reader

Writing Speeches

Language

(language  techniques,   vocabulary, formal register)

SPAG (commas)

 

Writing Autobiographies

  • Language (powerful vocabulary, exciting openings, chatty register)
  • Structure (paragraphs, time connectives, sentence structures)
  • Grammar (using consistent tense)
  • SPAG (using  
      commas)

Writing Adverts

  • Language (emotive, figurative, sentence types)
  • Structure (using headings and subheadings)
  • Grammar (different tenses)

 

Writing Soliloquies

  • Language
    (emotive, powerful vocabulary, figurative)
  • Structure (structuring a soliloquy)

 

Writing Diary Entries

  • Language (powerful vocabulary, anecdotes, chatty register)
  • Structure (varying sentences, paragraphs)
  • SPAG (commas)

 

Writing Pop Tests

  • Language (vocabulary, figurative, variety of tones/registers, sensory)
  • SPAG (commas, full stops,exclamation marks, speech marks)
  • Structure (cohesive devices, paragraphs)

YEAR 8 

Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1
Persuasive Writing Journeys The Gothic

Writing SHS Leaflet

  • Language (techniques

  including DAFOREST,

  different tenses, figurative,
  vocabulary)

  • Structure (paragraphing and subheadings)
  • SPAG (commas, full stops, exclamation marks, speech marks)

Chaucer Reading

  • Inference
  • Retrieval of evidence
  • Close language analysis
  • Effect on reader
  • Context
  • Extended analysis

Reading

  • Inference
  • Retrieval of evidence
  • Close language analysis
  • Effect on reader
  • Extended analysis

Letter Writing

  • Language (formal register, vocabulary)
  • Structure  (paragraphing,features of a letter, sentence types)

Writing Gothic Opening

  • Language (figurative  language, vocabulary, different tenses, sensory)
  • Structure (paragraphing, sentence types)
  • SPAG (semicolons, dashes and ellipsis)

 

 Year 8 (cont.)

Summer 1 Summer 2 Spring 2
Conflict Poetry Poetry and Play Comparison Play + Film

Reading

  • Inference
  • Retrieval of evidence
  • Analysis of techniques (language and structure)
  • Effect on reader
  • Context
  • Author Intentions
  • Essay Writing

Reading

  • Inference
  • Retrieval of evidence
  • Analysis of techniques
  • Effect on reader
  • Context
  • Essay Writing
  • Comparison

Gothic Film Review

  • Language (register, tone, media language)
  • Structure (structuring a review, sentence types)
  • SPAG (semicolons, dashes and ellipsis)

Face Reading

  • Inference
  • Retrieval of evidence
  • Close language analysis
  • Analysing staging
  • Effect on audience
  • Context
  • Essay Writing

KS4

All pupils will study towards a GCSE in English Language (AQA 8700) and English Literature (AQA 8702).

The English Language GCSE enables pupils to develop as proficient readers and writers – both for fiction and non-fiction texts. Throughout Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will be practising and mastering the following skills:

  • Identifying implicit and explicit information from texts
  • Analysing language and structure
  • Evaluating texts
  • Comparing texts as well as writers’ viewpoints and ideas
  • Descriptive writing
  • Narrative writing
  • Writing to argue/persuade
  • Writing to explain/instruct/advise
  • Writing a range of non-fiction text types (i.e. newspaper, letter and speech writing)

 Assessment

There are two externally assessed exams. Each are worth 50% of your English Language GCSE:

  • Paper 1 (1 hour 45 minutes): Explorations in creative reading and writing.
  • Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes): Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives.

The English Literature GCSE provides pupils with opportunities to thoroughly explore, shape their own opinions about, and morally learn from, a variety of texts and their characters. The texts range from those published in the 1600s to more recent literary work. The ones we have selected to study include:

  • Macbeth (William Shakespeare)
  • A Christmas Carol (Charles Dickens)
  • An Inspector Calls (J.B Priestley)
  • Power and Conflict Poetry (including poems written by Ted Hughes and Carol Ann Duffy)

Pupils will also learn to effectively explore, analyse and compare two unseen poems.

Assessment

There are two externally assessed exams for the English Literature GCSE:

  • Paper 1 (1 hour 45 minutes): Shakespeare and the 19th–Century Novel. This paper is worth 40% of your English Literature GCSE.
  • Paper 2 (2 hours 15 minutes): Modern Texts and Poetry. This paper is worth 60% of your English Literature GCSE.

 

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

  • Film Club
  • Paired Reading with pupils at a local primary school
  • Theatre trips
  • Inter-house spelling competitions
  • Word of the Week
  • Workshop days with established authors
  • World Book Day activities (including the opportunity to acquire a free book)
  • Use of Saracens’ brand new school library, which hosts a varied selection of books

LEARNING RESOURCES

 

 Geography

Curriculum Lead: Miss Morphitis

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

"Geography is the subject that holds the key to our future." Sir Michael Palin, knighted for services to travel, culture and geography.

Geography is the gateway to the world. It allows students understand their world and the lives of other people both near and far. Our world is an exciting place - so the study of it should be too. It is a subject which has something for everyone, science, arts, people and politics, it’s all there! The curriculum will provide our pupils with a deep and rich understanding of the world in which they live. They will gain an understanding of the relationships between people and the environment, the diversity of cultures, and the constant changes in landscapes, economies and societies.

Geography informs us about:

  • The places and communities in which we live and work
  • Our natural environments and the pressures they face
  • The interconnectedness of the world and our communities within it
  • How and why the world is changing, both globally and locally
  • How our individual and societal actions contribute to those changes
  • The choices that exist in managing our world for the future
  • The importance of location in business and decision-making

KS3

Pupils in Year 7 and in Year 8 will study geography for 2 lessons per week. They will study a range of topics to develop their geographical skills and give them an understanding of the broad scope of the subject. Each half term they will be focusing on a different aspect of geography, which will include a range of local, national and global case studies.

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Unit title and Learning objectives

Our World

Frozen Planet

Blue Planet

Spotlight on Africa

Coastal Conflict

Tourism

  • Globes
  • Scale - Barnet, London, UK, EU
  • Maps
  • GIS
  • Antarctica
  • Exploration
  • Governance
  • Glaciers
  • Species/food chains
  • Research
  • Climate change
  • Tourism
  • Icebergs
  • Development/ future
  • Oceans
  • Ocean currents
  • Tides
  • Coral reef
  • Plastic pollution
  • Acidification
  • Coral bleaching
  • Climate change
  • Fishing
  • Countries
  • Animals/ conservation
  • Ecosystems
  • Climate
  • Conflict
  • Migration – Sudan
  • Development - Ghana
  • Erosion
  • Arch-stack-stump
  • Bay, headland
  • Longshore drift
  • Management
  • OS Map skills
  • Field trip
  • Coasts DME
  • Mass tourism
  • Ecotourism
  • Sustainable tourism
  • Conservation
  • Ibiza
  • The Gambia
  • Galapagos Islands

Weather and climate

  • Water cycle
  • Local weather
  • UK weather patterns
  • Clouds, rain
  • Pressure
  • Climate graphs/data
  • Air circulation
  • Climate change
  • Weather hazards
  • Hurricanes
  • Hurricane Katrina DME

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spotlight on Brazil

  • Deforestation
  • Tourism - Iguassu
  • Rainforests – ecosystems

 

YEAR 8

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Restless Earth

  • Plate tectonics
  • Earthquakes
  • Volcanoes
  • Tsunami
  • Monitoring
  • Mitigation
  • Management

Spotlight on Iceland

  • Geothermal
  • Glaciers
  • Volcanoes
  • Tourism
  • Fishing/ whales

 

Cities

  • Megacities
  • Redevelopment
  • Shopping
  • Crime
  • Traffic
  • Identity, place making, home

 

Spotlight on China

  • Cities
  • Recycling
  • Trade

Future cities

  • Sustainability
  • Electric cars

Resources/Food

  • Energy
  • Fossil fuels
  • Local /global
  • Food miles - Nutella
  • Fertilisers
  • Seasonality
  • Deforestation
  • Palm oil
  • Packaging
  • Coffee / chocolate

 

 Population Pressures

  • Population change
  • Population pyramids
  • Migration
  • Ageing population
  • Syria
  • In this world

 

Spotlight on Brazil

  • Migration
  • Inequality
  • Cities
  • Favelas

 

Water World

  • Rivers
  • Cross sections
  • Long profiles
  • Waterfalls
  • Valleys
  • Meanders
  • Estuaries /deltas
  • Flooding
  • Unreliable water
  • Water management
  • HEP
  • Pollution

Globalisation

  • Clothing/ fast fashion
  • Transport
  • Geopolitics – Golan Heights
  • Football/ sport
  • Olympics DME

 

KS4

If pupils choose to study GCSE Geography (Edexcel B 1GB0) they will be given the opportunity to understand more about the world, the challenges it faces and their place within it. This GCSE course will deepen understanding of geographical processes, highlight the links between people and environments at difference scales, and develop pupils’ geographical investigative skills. Geography enables young people to become globally and environmentally informed and thoughtful, enquiring citizens.

Getting out and completing their own geographical investigations is an essential part of Geography GCSE. During the course they will take part in two fieldwork trips in a variety of environments.

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

  • People and the biosphere
  • Weather hazards
  • Consuming energy resources
  • Forests under threat
  • Climate Change
  • Emerging country

 

  • Megacities
  • Inequality
  • Rivers
  • Urbanisation
  • Coasts
  • Coastal fieldwork
  • UK human landscapes
  • UK rural environments
  • UK city
  • Urban fieldwork
  • Tectonic hazards
  • Mock exams and revision

Assessment

The course is assessed through 3 externally examined papers.

  • Paper 1 – Global Geographical Issues. 1 hour 30 minutes. 37.5% of the qualification.
  • Paper 2 – UK Geographical Issues. 1 hour 30 minutes. 37.5% of the qualification.
  • Paper 3 – People and Environmental Issues – Making Geographical Decisions. 1 hour 30 minutes. 25% of the qualification. This examination will consist of a booklet of sources, provided in the examination, that the pupil uses, analyses and interprets, so they are able to make reasoned justifications for proposed solutions.

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

  • Global Club
  • Trip to the London Aquarium
  • University of Birmingham photography competition
  • Oceans are not rubbish competition
  • Send my friend to school
  • Missing Maps
  • Commonwealth Row
  • National competitions through the Geographical Association and Royal Geographical Society (who we are members of)
  • Doddle

 LEARNING RESOURCES

 History

Subject Lead: Miss Luscombe

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Through the study of history pupils develop an understanding of the significance of the past and how historical events can both impact and be applied to the present. Through a balanced study of History, we also aim to touch on the full range of human experience and develop in pupils a sense of moral and civic awareness. Consideration of gender, ethnic, cultural and geographical diversity is critical to historical narrative, political debate, empathy and historical imagination. We also want to give our pupils a life long love of History by delivering engaging and interesting lessons that challenges them to look at the world from a number of different perspectives.

KS3

Pupils in Year 7 and in Year 8 have 2 lessons of history per week. They will gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider work. The lessons will equip the pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments and develop perspective and judgement.

The National Curriculum at Key Stage 3 in England requires students to cover British history from 1066 to present, as well as a world study, a local study and a chronological unit of study that will reach back before 1066 to consolidate knowledge and understanding.

The Aims of studying history include:

  • Know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world; the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies;
  • Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short-term and long-term timescales.

YEAR 7 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Unit title and Learning objectives

Roman Empire

Anglo-Saxons

Normans

Medieval England

Tudors

English Civil War

  • What is history?
  • Chronology
  • How civilised were the Romans?
  • Roman cities
  • Roman army
  • Gladiators
  • The republic
  • Empire collapse
  • Legacy of Roman Empire
  • Vikings
  • Godwin
  • Claimants to the throne
  • Defeating the Vikings
  • Battle of Stamford Bridge
  • Battle of Hastings (1066)
  • How did Harold die?
  • Bayeux Tapestry

 

  • William the Conquerer
  • Impact of the Normans on England
  • Feudal System
  • Castles
  • Domesday Book
  • Language
  • Women 
  • King or Pope
  • Excommunication
  • Thomas Becket
  • Black Death
  • Peasants revolt
  • King John and the Magna Carta
  • Women in power 
  • 1485-1603
  • War of Roses
  • Henry VIII
  • Break with Rome
  • Edward VI
  • Mary I
  • Elizabeth I
  • Spanish Armada
  • Golden Age

 

  • Charles I
  • Parliament
  • Causes
  • Who fought
  • Life during the civil war
  • Did Charles deserve to be executed?
  • The Great Fire of London

Local History

  • Battle of Barnet

YEAR 8 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

African Kingdoms

British Empire

Holocaust

World War 1

20th Century USA

20th Century South Africa

  • Different kingdoms
  • Timbuktu
  • How powerful were African Kingdoms
  • Islam in Africa
  • Slavery in Africa
  • First European contact
  • Good/Bad
  • Importance
  • Country case studies
  • Impact on UK
  • Impact on world
  • Link to slavery
  • Match up with Holocaust memorial day
  • Causes
  • Propaganda
  • Trenches
  • Battle of the Somme
  • Empire support
  • Armistice
  • Treaty of Versailles
  • Saracens WW1
  • Jim Crow
  • KKK
  • Black Civil Rights
  • Rosa Parks
  • Malcom X
  • Black Panthers
  • Martin Luther King

Make links to migration unit

  • Mandela
  • Apartheid
  • Robin Island
  • Segregation
  • Impact of sport/ commonwealth

Migration to the UK

Black History

India

Local History

Local History

  • Why do people leave home?
  • How were West Indians treated?
  • How were Asian migrants treated?
  • Slavery
  • Africa before Slavery
  • Middle Passage
  • Slave auction
  • Plantations
  • Abolition of slavery UK/USA
  • British Empire in India
  • Black Hole of Calcutta
  • India Mutiny
  • 20th Century India
  • Amritsar
  • Gandhi
  • Indian revolution
  • Battle of Barnet
  • RAF Museum
  • Barnet Church / Well

 

KS4

At KS4 pupils can choose to study GCSE History (AQA 8145) as one of their options. Our History GCSE aims to promote pupils’ understanding of the world in which they live, and to allow them to make informed decisions based on evidence and information about the past. In a modern society where we are all subjected to techniques of mass persuasion, a secure grounding in the knowledge and skills developed in history is a fundamental prerequisite for citizenship, political, social, religious and personal development. By the end of the course pupils will have looked at a wide range of topics and will thus understand that to comprehend the world in which they live today they must first know about the past.

Topics you will study:

  • Norman England 1066-1100
  • Migration 790-present
  • Conflict and Tension: The Inter-War Years 1918-1939
  • Germany 1890 – 1945

Assessment

All assessments in History are written examinations (2 hours). Both examinations will feature a combination of source questions and essay questions; which pupils will develop the skills to answer throughout the course.

  • Paper 1: Understanding the modern world – this helps pupils to understand key developments and events in modern world history.
  • Paper 2: Shaping the nation – this enables pupils to understand key developments and events in the history of Britain.

 

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

  • Trip to the RAF Museum to look at local history, as part of Our History month
  • Trip to the Egyptian Cultural Centre
  • Our History migration project
  • Castles project

LEARNING RESOURCES

 Languages

Curriculum Lead: Mrs Bonilla

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

The ultimate aim of teaching foreign languages is to encourage and combine an enjoyment of learning, an interest in the wider world, and an enthusiasm for communicating in a foreign language. We strive to make our pupils aware that:languages lead to greater international and global understanding, to greater opportunities in the world of work, to greater leisure opportunities, to greater cultural awareness and appreciation and also that languages are of benefit to individuals and to the country as a trading nation. 

KS3

Pupils in Year 7 and in Year 8 have three hours of Spanish a week. Although we have access to the digital version of the book VIVA, it is not expected that teachers follow the textbook as a matter of course, the schemes of learning outline key teaching points each term and teachers adapt their own materials to these accordingly. Pupils will have an opportunity to study a second foreign language as part of our enrichment curriculum.

YEAR 7 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Unit title and Learning objectives

COCO

VOY A MI BOLA 

MI COLE

MI CIUDAD

REVISION / ASSESSMENT AND PROJECT WORK

Mi vida (My life)

 

Mi familia y mis amigos

(My family and my friends)

Mi tiempo libre

(My free time)

Mi insti

(My school)

Mi ciudad

(My city)

 

Getting used to Spanish pronunciation.

 Introducing yourself

Talking about your personality.

 Using adjectives that end in -o/-a.

 Talking about age, brothers and sisters.

 Using the verb tener (to have).

Saying when your birthday is.

 Using numbers and the alphabet.

 

Talking about your pets.

 

Making adjectives agree with nouns.

 

Writing a text for a time capsule.

 

Adding variety to your writing.

Describing your family.

 Using possessive adjectives.

 Describing your hair and eye colour.

 Using verbs ser and tener.

 Saying what other people look like.

 Using verbs in the third person.

 

Describing where you live.

 

Using the verb estar (to be).

 

Reading about the carnival in Cadiz.

 

Looking up new Spanish words in a dictionary.

Saying what you like to do.

 

Giving opinions using me gusta + infinitive.

 Saying what you do in your spare time.

 Using -ar verbs in the present tense.

 

Talking about the weather.

 Using cuando (when).

 

Saying what sports you do.

 

Using hacer (to do) and jugar (to play).

 

Reading about someone’s favourite things.

 

Understanding more challenging texts.

 

Taking part in a longer conversation.

 

Using question words

Saying what subjects you study.

 

Using -ar verbs to say what ‘we’ do.

 

Giving opinions about school subjects.

 

Using me gusta(n) + el/la/los/las.

Describing your school.

 

Using the words for ‘a’, ‘some’ and ‘the’

Talking about break time.

 

Using -er and -ir verbs’.

 

Understanding details about schools.

 

Using prediction as a listening strategy.

Describing your town or village .

 

Using ‘a’, ‘some’ and ‘many’ in Spanish.

 

Telling the time

Using the verb ir (to go).

 

Ordering in a café

Using the verb querer (to want).

 

Saying what you are going to do at the weekend.

 

Using the near future tense.

 

Understanding people describing their town.

 

Listening for detail.

 

Revision and Assessment.

 

Project/cross-curricular work.

 

 

YEAR 8

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

DISFRUTANDO COMO ENANOS

ENGANCHADOS

A TAPEAR

LA PASCUA

DE COPAS

REVISION / ASSESSMENT / GCSE READY

Mis vacaciones (My holidays)

Todo sobre mi vida

(All about my life)

A comer

 (Let’s eat)

Chocolate (Chocolate)

Qué hacemos (What shall we do?)

 

  • Talking about a past holiday.
  • Using the preterite of ir.
  • Saying what you did on holiday.
  • Using the preterite of regular -ar verbs.
  • Describing the last day on holiday.
  • Using the preterite of -er and –ir verbs.
  • Saying what your holiday was like.
  • Using the preterite of ser.
  • Giving a presentation about your holiday.
  • Making your sentences interesting.
  • Using the present and the preterite together. 
  • Describing an amazing holiday.
  • Saying what you use your phone for.
  • Revising the present tense.
  • Saying what type of music you like.
  • Giving a range of opinions.
  • Talking about TV
  • Using the comparative.
  • Saying what you did yesterday.
  • Using the present and the preterite.
  • Understanding a TV guide.
  • Tackling an authentic text.
  • Learning about young peoples’ lives.
  • Using two tenses in the ‘he/she’ form.

 

  • Saying what food you like.
  • Using a wider range of opinions.
  • Describing mealtimes.
  • Using negatives. 
  • Ordering a meal.
  • Using usted / ustedes.
  • Discussing what to buy for a party.
  • Using the near future.
  • Giving an account of a party.
  • Using three tenses together
  • Learning how to form questions to find out someone’s opinion on chocolate. 
  • Learning how to use comparative and superlative phrases based on chocolate preferences.
  • Developing knowledge of key adjectives.
  • Expressing personal opinions. 
  • Learning about rainforests and the weather. To be able to describe the weather 
  • Learning how to form the Imperfect tense in Spanish.
  • Conjugating regular verbs with little support.
  • Learning about the history of chocolate. 
  • Fairtrade: Developing an awareness of life in Ghana.
  • Recognising the differences between the Present and Imperfect endings
  • Arranging to go out
  • Using me gustaría + infinitive.
  • Making excuses
  • Using querer and poder.
  • Saying what other people look like.
  • Using verbs in the third person.
  • Talking about clothes.
  • Saying ‘this/these’.
  • Talking about sporting events.
  • Using three tenses
  • Revision and Assessment.
  • Project/cross-curricular work.
  • GCSE ready

 

 

KS4

At KS4 pupils can choose to study GCSE Spanish (AQA 8145) as one of their options. We will start our GCSE course in Year 9 with the first half term focused on revisiting topics covered in Year 7 and Year 8. At the end of Year 9, pupils will all be able to sit a Foundation GCSE exam past paper. 

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

  • Holidays
  • School
  • My community

 

  • Sports and entertainment
  • The world of work
  • Traditions and customs

 

  • The environment
  • Areas and cities
  • Revision and exam practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment

  • Listening (25%) – 35 or 45 minutes (Foundation/Higher)
  • Speaking (25%) – 7 or 10 minutes (Foundation/Higher) + preparation time
  • Reading (including translation into English 25%) – 45 or 60 minutes (Foundation/Higher)
  • Writing (including translation into Spanish 25%) – 1h or1h 15 minutes (Foundation/Higher)

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

  • Young Language Leaders club
  • Trip to the cinema to watch ‘Coco’
  • Celebration of the Chinese New Year
  • Spelling Bee
  • Inter-house foreign song competition
  • European Language Day in September
  • Pancake Day
  • Language Summer Festival

LEARNING RESOURCES

 Maths

Curriculum Lead: Mrs Mander

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Our aim is that every pupil athematics can be enjoyed and appreciated more fully once a pupil has a deep sense of the number system. We prioritise depth over breadth, challenging our pupils to build on prior learning, make connections between concepts and apply what they have learnt to unfamiliar contexts.

KS3

Pupils in Year 7 and in Year 8 have five 50 minute lessons of Maths a week and are taught in mixed attainment classes. They follow a Mathematics Mastery, research-led, curriculum. This does not follow one specific textbook. Pupils are set 2 home-learnings for Maths each week.

Pupils develop their recall speeds of multiplication and division facts through the regular use of Times Table Rockstars in Year 7. We use visuals and concrete manipulatives in class to support pupils’ conceptual understanding.

YEAR 7

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Unit title and Learning objectives

Solve word problems (Addition & Subtraction)

Explain & Investigate (Multiplication & Division)

Geometry

Fractions

Applications of Algebra

Percentages and Statistics

  • Number bonds
  • Convert units
  • Money +/−
  • Measurement
  • Mental strategies
  • Multiplication facts
  • Multiplication strategies
  • Solve number problems
  • Lengths and units
  • Parallel and perpendicular
  • Work with angles
  • Division and the mean
  • Equal parts
  • Factors and multiples
  • Tenths and hundredths
  • Word problems
  • Fractional areas
  • Areas of rectangles and triangles
  • Number patterns
  • Algebraic notation
  • Triangle and quadrilateral properties
  • Decimals and problem solving
  • Fractions of shapes
  • Equivalence
  • Order of operations

Link to KS3 content:

  • Place value (including decimals)
  • Add and subtract (including decimals)
  • Rounding
  • Perimeter
  • Mental strategies
  • Factors and multiples
  • Multiply and divide (including decimals)
  • Area of rectangle, triangle and parallelogram
  • Calculate the mean
  • Further mental strategies
  • Draw and measure angles
  • Find unknown angles (straight lines, at a point, vertically opposite)
  • Properties of triangles and quadrilaterals
  • Unit conversions (linear)
  • Symmetry and tessellation
  • Equivalent fractions
  • Compare and order fractions and decimals
  • Change mixed numbers to improper fractions and vice versa
  • Fraction of a quantity
  • Multiply and divide fractions
  • Order of operations
  • Substitution
  • Form and simplify algebraic expressions
  • Expand over a single bracket, and factorise
  • Sequences (term-to-term, not nth term)
  • Construct and interpret statistical diagrams including pie charts
  • Convert between percentages, vulgar fractions and decimals
  • Percentage of a quantity
  • Find the whole, given the part and the percentage

Stretch & Depth:

  • Different counting systems or bases
  • Generalisation
  • Upper and lower bounds
  • Shikaku puzzles
  • Different counting systems or bases
  • Alternative methods of multiplication
  • Generalisation
  • Tessellating triangles and quadrilaterals
  • Tangram investigations
  • Rigid shapes
  • Terminating and recurring decimals
  • Fractions of tangrams
  • Shape block challenges
  • Four fours
  • Patterns and generalising
  • Algebraic mean questions
  • Comparing and converting between representations
  • Applications of percentages

YEAR 8

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Unit title and Learning objectives

Number

Algebraic Expressions

2D Geometry

Proportional Reasoning

3D Geometry

Statistics

  • Factors, multiples and primes
  • Multiplication and division
  • Fraction equivalence and calculations
  • Problem solving with fractions
  • Order of operations
  • Form algebraic expressions
  • Substitution
  • Angle types
  • Angle facts
  • Rectangle and triangle areas
  • ×/÷ by powers of 10
  • Problem solving with negative numbers
  • Rounding
  • Bar modelling with factions
  • Fraction ×/÷
  • Bar modelling with equations
  • FDP equivalence
  • Rectilinear areas
  • Fraction +/−
  • Problem solving with fractions
  • Percentage increase and decrease
  • Substitution with negatives
  • Statistical diagrams
  • Ratio and rate
  • The mean
  • Calculator skills and rounding

Link to KS3 content:

  • Primes and indices
  • Prime factorisation, squares and cubes
  • Use of Venn diagrams to find LCM and HCF
  • Add and subtract fractions
  • Order and calculate with negative numbers
  • Form and solve linear equations (unknowns on one side)
  • Use more complex algebraic expressions
  • Linear sequences: nth term
  • Construct triangles and quadrilaterals
  • Calculate unknown angles (including parallel lines)
  • Unit conversions (including area)
  • Area of a trapezium
  • Areas and perimeters of composite figures
  • Percentage increase and decrease, including multipliers
  • Reverse percentage problems
  • Ratio (equivalent, of a quantity) and rate
  • Scaling and multipliers
  • Speed, distance, time
  • Use of significant figures and estimation
  • Circumference and area of a circle
  • Visualise and identify 3-D shapes and their nets
  • ·Volume of cuboid, prism, cylinder, composite solids
  • Surface area
  • Collect and organise data, including surveys
  • Interpret and compare statistical representations
  • Mean, median and mode averages
  • The range and outliers

Stretch & Depth:

  • Egyptian fractions
  • Continued fractions
  • HCF and LCM generalisation
  • Explore non-linear sequences
  • T-totals
  • Similarity and ratio
  • Complex constructions
  • Simple angle proofs
  • Density
  • Area scale factors
  • Loan repayment
  • Platonic solids
  • Percentage errors
  • Plans and elevations
  • Misleading graphs
  • Equal width histograms
  • Sampling methods

KS4

All pupils will study GCSE Mathematics (Edexcel 1MA1). The Mathematics GCSE is designed to test pupils’ conceptual understanding of Mathematics, with a large part of the exam testing pupils’ ability to use skills they have learnt to solve problems in context. We therefore deliver a mastery curriculum which builds depth of knowledge, mathematical fluency and encourages pupils to regularly make connections, problem solve and apply their skills to unfamiliar contexts. We believe this is the best way to equip pupils for the GCSE and to ensure they have essential skills for life.

The GCSE covers 6 topics:

  • Number
  • Geometry
  • Ratio & Proportion
  • Algebra
  • Statistics
  • Probability

Assessment

The GCSE is made up of 3 papers, each with equal weighting:

  • Paper 1: Non-calculator (80 marks, 1 hour & 30 minutes)
  • Paper 2: Calculator (80 marks, 1 hour & 30 minutes)
  • Paper 3: Calculator (80 marks, 1 hour & 30 minutes)

Pupils will sit one of two tiers:

  • Foundation tier: Grades 1 to 5 (most weighting on Ratio & Proportion)
  • Higher tier: Grades 3 to 9 (most weighting on Algebra)

 

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

  • Mathletes
  • Inter-house University Challenge
  • Times Table Rockstars
  • Inter-house Rock Wrangles
  • UKMT Challenge
  • Pangea Maths UK Competition

 

LEARNING RESOURCES

 Music

Subject Lead: Mr Guez

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

 The love and appreciation of Music adds so much to the quality of our lives. As we deepen our engagement in Music, whether by performing, composing or listening attentively to it, we come to appreciate what a wonderful gift it is. At Saracens High School, we aim to give pupils of all musical backgrounds a very positive experience of the subject. We encourage them to pursue their interest beyond the classroom.

KS3

Pupils in Year 7 and in Year 8 have 1 Lesson a week of Music. They are welcome every-time Mr Guez is free in the Music room at Break and lunch time where they can try any instrument they want.

 YEAR 7

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Unit title and Learning objectives

Pulse and Rhythm

 

Keyboard Line

Ukulele

 Chords and composition

Electronic Music

Band Project I

 Learning to play the Djembe drum

 

 Learning how to play the keyboard

Learning to play the Ukulele

 Learning how to create Triads.

 Making an instrumental using a music software

Forming a band and making a cover of a song of their choice

  • Pulse and rhythm
  • Polyrhythm
  • Ostinato
  • Playing in a group
  • Knowing the 3 sounds of the djembe.
  • Improvisation

 

  • Learning the name of the keys.
  • Composing short melodies
  • Playing with both hands.
  • Learning to play famous songs of different difficulty levels
  • Knowing how to read a Chord Tab.
  • Knowing how to read a fingerstyle tab.
  • Learning how to strum.
  • Learning to play C, G, Am and F.
  • Learning to play famous Ukulele songs in groups.
  • Learning the difference between Major and minor chords.
  • Knowing the technique to play any Major or minor triads on the keyboards.
  • Learning the different ways of playing triads Chord sequence
  • Composing a simple melody on top of a triad using the Notes of the triads and the passing notes.
  • Learning the notion of sampling.
  • Learning the specific skills of electronic music.
  • Using the knowledge of chord sequences and melody building to create a beat
  • Starting to learn modern Music structures.
  • Creating a collaborating beat. 
  • Remembering how to use a djembe, ukulele and keyboard.
  • Compiling all the skills learned over the year to choose a song and make a cover of it.
  • Bouncing back from failure
  • Trial and error
  • The student are given much more freedom so they learn independence and gain self confidence.
  • Best covers will perform in front of the school during assembly.

 

YEAR 8

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

 Program Music 

Blues

Film Music

Pop Music/Electronic Music II

What is GCSE Music?

Band Project II

Music that paints a picture or tells a story

Performing a blues song

Connection between Music and Cinema

Making a Pop Arrangement

Introduction to what will be in GCSE Music

Celebration of everything learned so far

  • Composition based unit.
  • Tempo
  • Dynamics
  • How to change the effect of your Music.
  • Tones and Semitones
  • Blues Scale
  • Improvisation
  • 12 Bar Blues
  • Walking Bass
  • Vamp
  • Listening
  • The importance of Music in Films.
  • What is the use?
  • Analysing famous Film Songs.
  • Creating their own film theme.
  • Students are learning about different musical devices used in popular songs including the use of hooks and riffs. Students will learn about how pop songs are arranged and how different artist and groups have created various arrangements of the same song
  • Learning notation.
  • Different ways to notate music.
  • What will have to be covered in GCSEss.

 

  • Same as in Year 7.
  • Students to see/realize the progress made over the two years. ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES
    Guitar Club
    Drumming Club
    Orchestra/Learning specific instruments such as violin
    Yearly concert /performances
    Lunch time Piano

 

KS4

Pupils can choose to study Music Practice Tech Award at Level 1 and 2 (Edexcel 603/2973/7). The Tech Award in Music is a practical introduction to life and work in the Music industry. You will be learning how the industry works and its different roles. You will learn how to record and set up equipment for both performances and rehearsals. This Tech Award is a great opportunity to develop your music knowledge and skills and will present the opportunity to visit professional studios and Music labels such as Sony.

The components will allow you to focus on a variety of skills including instrumental skills, understanding music and music theory, writing music using technology, and live performances (solo and ensemble). You will learn how to use digital audio software and equipment for writing, recording and producing music as well as other projects. Throughout the course you will enhance your knowledge of recording studio techniques, radio production techniques, and listening and analysing.

Assessment

This course is made of 3 units:

  • Exploring Music products and Styles. 30% of the overall grade, assessed by internal portfolio (externally moderated)
  • Musical skills development. 30% of the overall grade, assessed by internal portfolio (externally moderated)
  • Responding to a commercial brief. A set task completed under supervised conditions. 40% of the overall grade, assessed by an external assessor

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

  • Guitar Club
  • Drumming Club
  • Orchestra/Learning specific instruments such as violin
  • Yearly concert/performances
  • Lunch time Piano

LEARNING RESOURCES

 Philosophy, Religion & Ethics (PRE)

Subject Lead: Ms Wilson

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Philosophy, Religion and Ethics provokes challenging questions about the ultimate meaning and purpose of life, beliefs about God, the self and issues of right and wrong. It develops pupils’ knowledge and understanding of the 6 main religions. It enhances pupils’ awareness and understanding of religions and beliefs, teachings, practices and forms of expression, as well as of the influence of religion on individuals, families, communities and cultures. They explore ethical issues from personal perspectives and develop an understanding of other people’s views.

Employers recognise the valuable and transferable skills that come with studying Religious Studies. Additionally, UCAS states that…

“Knowledge of other cultures and world religious beliefs can be useful in many jobs where you are working with the public or communities. These include counselling and social services, marketing, sales and advertising, catering and hospitality, leisure, sport and tourism, retail sales and customer services, education and training, medicine and nursing, and service sector roles.”

 KS3

Pupils in Year 7 and in Year 8 have one lesson of PRE per week. Pupils learn about the traditions, beliefs, teachings, practices and forms of expression of 6 key religions: Judaism and Buddhism (Year 7) Hinduism, Christianity, Islam and Sikhism (Year 8).

 We offer pupils the opportunity to develop spiritually, morally, socially and culturally through the study of these religions. Pupils are also encouraged to reflect on what they have learnt and apply this to their own lives, even if the beliefs are different to their own.  They develop their ability to apply their knowledge and understanding of how religion impacts the individual, communities and society. The PRE curriculum also focuses on ethical debates and issues ranging from animal rights to miracles.

 YEAR 7

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Unit title and Learning objectives

Buddhism

  • Introduction to RE and world religions
  • Life of Buddha
  • Three poisons
  • Wheel of life
  • Buddhism rules
  • Sangha
  • Noble truths
  • Eightfold Path
  • Diversity of Buddhism
  • Dalai Lama
  • Buddhism in the UK

Judaism

  • Origins – Joseph and Moses
  • 10 commandments
  • Synagogue
  • Sabbath/ Shabbat
  • Festivals
  • Yom Kippur
  • Passover
  • Bar and Bat Mitzvah
  • Kosher food
  • Judaism in UK and Barnet

Philosophy and Religion

  • Ancient philosophers
  • Moral dilemmas
  • Existence of God
  • How did the world begin?
  • Miracles
  • The soul
  • Animals and humans
  • Should we eat meat?

 

 

YEAR 8

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Hinduism

  • Dharma
  • Hindu life
  • Sacred texts
  • Caste
  • Gandhi
  • Gods
  • Mandir
  • Diwali

Christianity

  • Old testament
  • Jesus
  • Gospels
  • Miracles and Parables
  • Baptism
  • Prayer
  • Worship
  • Church

 

Islam

  • Origins
  • Holy book
  • Prophets
  • Mosque
  • Imams
  • Festivals
  • Angels
  • Akhirah

Pilgrimage

Sikhism

  • Origins
  • Worship
  • Pilgrimage
  • Marriage
  • Gurdwara
  • Sikhism in the UK

Conflict and Religion

  • Peace
  • Attitudes of each religion to war
  • Quakers
  • Christian crusades
  • Israel/ Palestine
  • Terrorism

Ethics

  • Life is sacred
  • Abortion
  • Fertility treatment
  • Genetic engineering
  • Organ transplants
  • Suicide
  • Euthanasia
  • Women’s rights
  • Animal rights
  • Discrimination

 

KS4

All pupils will continue to study PRE into KS4 in one lesson per week. In these lessons they will work towards a certificate in Philosophy.

Pupils can also choose to study GCSE Religious Studies (AQA A 8062) as one of their options. Religious Studies gives you a good understanding of Islam and Christianity, their historical development and their relationship with the world in which we live. You will gain insight into the theological, ethical, cultural, political and philosophical issues of religion.

The GCSE consists of two components. Component 1 is the study of religions: beliefs, teachings and practices. The religions we will study are Christianity and Islam. Component 2: Thematic studies comprises of four religious, philosophical and ethical studies themes. The four themes that we will be studying are; Theme C: The existence of God and revelation, Theme D: Religion, peace and conflict, Theme E: Religion, crime and punishment, and Theme F: Religion, human rights and social justice.

In Year 9 we will focus of the key beliefs and practices of Islam and Christianity.

Assessment

  • Paper 1 – Christianity and Islam. 50% of final grade.
  • Paper 2 – four themes. 50% of final grade.

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

  • Global Club
  • Our History Month
  • Them and Us Month
  • Send my friend to school campaign
  • PiXL Edge

LEARNING RESOURCES

 PE

Curriculum Lead: Mr Giles

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Physical Education has a broad role to play in the development of the individual at Saracens High School, after all, opportunities to compete in sport and other activities build character and help to embed our values such as Discipline, Hard work, Honesty and Humility. Self-confidence, self-esteem and self-discipline are all characteristics that improve readily in the environment that is created within lessons.  We offer a high-quality Physical Education curriculum that inspires all pupils to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically demanding activities. All pupils have the opportunity to develop a variety of physical skills and we see each of them – regardless of talent or ability – as an individual with something to offer. We provide opportunities for pupils to become physically confident in a way which supports their health and fitness. Pupils are taught to become more competent, confident and expert in their techniques, and apply them across different sports and physical activities, while developing the confidence and interest to get involved in exercise.

KS3

Pupils in Year 7 and in Year 8 have 3 hours’ curriculum time per week.  During this time, they are able to develop their skills through a range of team sports like; Rugby, Netball, Handball and Football. Individual skills are developed through activities such as; Gymnastics, Athletics and Dance.  We strive to develop our pupil’s abilities to use a range of tactics and strategies, to overcome opponents in direct competition (through team and individual games), and develop their techniques and improve their performance in other competitive sports. We fully encourage our pupils to take part in competitive sports and activities outside of school, through our Saracens community links and extra-curricular sports clubs.

 YEAR 7

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Unit title and Learning objectives

Football 

Netball 

Rugby 

Basketball 

Athletics

Athletics

Handball

 

Gymnastics/

Dance

Table Tennis

Fitness

Rounders

Cricket

 YEAR 8

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Football

Netball

Rugby

Hockey

Athletics

Athletics

Handball 

Gymnastics

Table Tennis

Health Related Fitness

Rounders/

Softball

Cricket /

Lacrosse

 

KS4

All pupils will continue to have PE throughout KS4 to maintain a healthy lifestyle and develop good habits for life.

Pupils can choose to study Sport, Activity and Fitness Tech Award (Edexcel 603/0473/X) at Level 1/2 as one of their options. The course is made up of three components:

  • Understanding the body and supporting technology for sport and activity
  • Developing an understanding of the principles of training, nutrition and psychology for sport activity
  • Applying the principles of sport and activity.

 

In Year 9, pupils will mainly explore and develop their knowledge of the body systems (including the musculoskeletal system, respiratory system and cardiovascular system) and their responses and adaptations due to exercise and sport. How the body can get injured in sports the common sports injuries, causes and prevention of these injuries and the rehabilitation of these injuries.

Assessment

  • Component 1 will be internally assessed and makes up 30% of the final grade. This will be in the form of written reports/essays and presentations
  • Component 2 is assessed via an external examination that is set by the awarding examination board, and this will make up 40% of the final grade. The examination is 1 hour 30 minutes. 
  • Component 3 is internally assessed using synoptic techniques, and will make up the remaining 30% of the final grade.

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES/ EXTRA CURRICULAR CLUBS:

  • Rugby Training – Delivered by Saracens RFU coaches/ players
  • Table Tennis
  • Football
  • Fitness/ Cross country
  • Athletics
  • Netball
  • Rounders
  • Cricket

 LEARNING RESOURCES

 https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/subjects/zxf3cdm

 PSHCE

Personal, Social, and Health Education (PSHCE) is a basic entitlement for all pupils. PSHCE contributes to the development of personal skills with the acquisition of relevant knowledge and understanding. This should enable pupils to lead confident, healthy, responsible lives as individuals who make a positive contribution to their communities and to society as a whole. At Saracens High School pupils are encouraged to take part in a wide range of activities and experiences across and beyond the curriculum, contributing fully to the life of the school and the wider community. In particular, the House system and the many activities arranged within the Houses support an inclusive, participatory ethos.

PSHCE aims to enable pupils to:

  • Value others and feel valued
  • Respect others and be respected
  • Be independent and interdependent
  • Behave responsibly
  • Have a concern for justice and uphold the rights of others
  • Understand the consequences of their actions
  • Treat others the way they would like to be treated
  • Develop leadership, organisation, resilience, initiative and communication skills.

 

PSHCE gives pupils opportunities to reflect on their experiences and understand how they are developing personally and socially, encompassing many of the spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues in their lives and those of others in society, allowing them to build meaningful relationships. It also promotes pupils’ well-being and self-esteem enabling them to take responsibility for their learning and life choices. PSHE is the joint responsibility of the individual, the family, the school and the wider community.

Through our PSHCE programme, individual pupils are encouraged to show respect for our common humanity, diversity and the differences between people. PSHE in the school curriculum at Saracens High School provides many opportunities to promote pupils’ personal and social development including belonging and identity, relationship and sex education, substance education, financial education, careers education, human rights and abuses including Female Genital Mutilation (FGM). It also compliments lessons from the school curriculum covering areas such as issues in politics, the law, family, the environment, British Values, E-safety, self-awareness and the media.

Outside of the curriculum the following add value to PSHCE within the wider school context:

  • Core and foundation subjects
  • PiXL Them and Us and The Edge programmes
  • Assemblies (Year, House, and whole school)
  • House activities
  • House and school elections
  • School charities
  • Cross-curricular projects
  • School/pupil council
  • Invited visitors
  • Daily Learning group sessions
  • Work with vulnerable pupils including social skills groups, and the work of the SEND staff, including Learning Mentors
  • Educational visits
  • Residential experiences
  • Sports teams & other activities
  • Work experience.

We also recognise and celebrate local and national events including:

  • Black History Month
  • Diversity Week
  • Them and Us Month
  • International Week
  • Our History Month
  • Holocaust Memorial
  • Religious Festivals
  • Safer Internet Day
  • Relationships, Sex and Health Education Days
  • Making Memories Week.

Our PSHCE and RSHE policies can be found here:

http://www.saracenshigh.org/Policies/

Advice and Wellbeing Support for pupils can be found here:

https://www.kooth.com/

https://youngminds.org.uk/

https://www.childline.org.uk/

 

Curriculum Overview

Year 7

Mr Rudd

Year 8

Ms Freeman

Year 9

Mr Mitman

Autumn Term 1

Autumn Term 1

Autumn Term 1

Making sense of COVID

Making sense of COVID

Making sense of COVID

Kindness

Kindness

Kindness

Emotions 

Emotions 

Emotions 

Conflict/Domestic Abuse

Conflict/Domestic Abuse

Conflict/Domestic Abuse

Economic Vulnerability 

Economic Vulnerability 

Economic Vulnerability 

- Bereavement 

- Bereavement 

Bereavement 

Autumn Term 2

Autumn Term 2

Autumn Term 2

Mental Health & Where to get support

Mental Health & Where to get support

Mental Health & Where to get support

Friendships 

Friendships 

Friendships 

Bullying

Bullying

Bullying

Spring Term 1

Spring Term 1

Spring Term 1

Healthy Eating

Healthy Eating

Consent

Diet

Diet

 Sex Education 

Energy Drinks

Energy Drinks

Pornography

Active Lifestyle and Consequences

Active Lifestyle and Consequences

Sexting

Puberty & Body Image

Puberty & Body Image

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Hygeine

Hygeine

Body Image

Spring Term 2

Spring Term 2

Spring Term 2

ICT Safety

Consent

Healthy Eating 

Digital Footprint

 Sex Education 

Diet 

Sharing Personal Information

Pornography

Energy Drinks 

Chatrooms

Sexting

Active Lifestyle and Consequences

Social Networks

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Eating Disorders 

Sexting

Body Image

Substance Misuse 

Summer Term 1

Summer Term 1

Summer Term 1

Budgeting

Career Pathways 

Career Pathways 

Saving

Future Plans

Future Plans

Avoiding Debt

The Work Place 

The Work Place 

Making Money

Enterprise 

Enterprise 

Financial Products

Enterprise 

Enterprise 

Transactions

Enterprise 

Enterprise 

Summer Term 2

Summer Term 2

Summer Term 2

Stereotypes 

Stereotypes 

Stereotypes 

Islamophobia 

Islamophobia 

Islamophobia 

Homophobia 

Homophobia 

Homophobia 

Disability 

Disability 

Disability 

Different Culture 

Different Culture 

Different Culture 

Radicalisation

Radicalisation

Radicalisation

 Science

Curriculum Lead: Mr Tester

CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

All individuals are naturally curious, which makes science an ideal subject for them to learn. Science at Saracens allows pupils to explore their world and discover new things. It is also an active subject, containing activities such as hands-on labs and experiments. It gives them an insight of the real life experiments and creations that goes on around them. Our lessons promote challenge, resilience and creative thinking. The aim is to use all the sciences Physics, Biology and Chemistry to help create a well rounded individual.

KS3

Pupils in Year 7 and in Year 8 follow a 2-year KS3 and a 3-year GCSE, leading up to the AQA GCSE Science Foundation / Higher.

The models below are based on the following principles:

  • A 14-week Autumn Term, followed by two 12-week terms per academic year.
  • A focussed revision period within each topic with a review lesson post topic test.
  • An average of 4 hours a week is used for science lessons

The core foci within the curriculum include:

Mathematical skills, numeracy makes up 10% of the GCSE exams including scaled graph drawing, percentage change, working out the mean, range and median. As well as working with ratios such as surface area to volume ratios.

Literacy skills: Students are expected to answer questions that require a level of analysis and evaluation of key science topics, such as whether embryonic screening should be allowed or whether euglena is an animal or plant cell. Within the GCSE Curriculum students have to be able to answer ‘6 mark’ long answer questions such as the comparison of adaptations between the camel and polar bear.

Practical skills, a sections of ‘core practical’s have been added to the curriculum. Core practical ‘must’ be carried out by the student within the laboratory and determine whether they pass the science course or not.  Attendance for practical’s in year 7 is therefore necessary as it helps to build the foundation needed for GCSE. The 2 year practical KS3 curriculum will include step by step demonstrations and whole class practical experience. Students are also required to carry out data analysis and write up methods with independent, dependant and control variables.

Overall the exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives

AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: 40%
1) scientific ideas
2) scientific techniques and procedures.

AO2: Apply knowledge and understanding of: 40%
1) scientific ideas
2) scientific enquiry, techniques and procedures.

AO3: Analyse information and ideas to: 20%
1a) interpret 1b) evaluate 
2a) make judgements 2b) draw conclusions
3a) develop experimental procedures 3b) improve experimental procedures.

 

 YEAR 7

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Unit title and Learning objectives

 Cells

Focus: literacy

 

 Matter

Focus: numeracy

 Acids and Alkalis

Focus: practical work

 Reactions

Focus: practical work

 Forces

Focus: numeracy

Combustion

Focus: practical work

 Introduction into action in Science

 Focus: practical work

 Animal reproduction

 Focus: Literacy

 Ecosystems

Focus: numeracy

 Energy

Focus: literacy

 Electricity

 Focus: practical work 

 Fluids

  Focus: numeracy

 

  

 

 

 

 

Food and nutrition

Focus: literacy

  YEAR 8

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Light and sound

Focus: numeracy

 

Rocks:

Focus: literacy

Earth

 Focus: numeracy

Electromagnets

Focus: numeracy

The periodic table and atomic structure

Focus: numeracy

Energy GCSE transition

Focus: practical’s

Genetics and evolution

 Focus: Literacy

 

Breathing and respiration

Focus: practical

Unicellular organisms

 Focus: literacy

Making salts

  Focus: practical

Cell structure and transport, GCSE transition:

 Focus: Literacy

Separating substances GCSE transition

 Focus: Practical

 

  

 

 

Plant growth

Focus: literacy

 

 

 

KS4

All pupils will study science in KS4. Most will complete the Double GCSE Science (AQA 8464). There is the option for our top scientist to choose to study Single Science as one of their options.

Double Science covers;

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

  • Cell biology
  • Organisation
  • Infection and response
  • Bioenergetics
  • Homeostasis and response
  • Inheritance, variation and evolution
  • Ecology
  • Atomic structure and the periodic table
  • Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter
  • Quantitative chemistry
  • Chemical changes
  • Energy changes
  • The rate and extent of chemical change
  • Organic chemistry
  • Chemical analysis
  • Chemistry of the atmosphere
  • Using resources
  • Energy
  • Electricity
  • Particle model of matter
  • Atomic structure
  • Forces
  • Waves
  • Magnetism and electromagnetism

 

 

Year 9 will begin with topics that include cell biology; waves; forces; electrolysis; organisation; atomic structure and the periodic table; homeostasis and responses; bonding, structure, and the properties of matter.

Assessment

The combined science course is worth two GCSEs. The qualification is assessed by six, 1 hour 15 minute exams; two in biology, two in chemistry and two in physics. As well as assessing subject knowledge and understanding, pupils will also be assessed in the skills required in working scientifically, maths and practical assessments.

Each exam paper is out of 70 marks and consist of multiple choice, structured, closed short answer, and longer open response questions.

If they choose to study the sciences as separated courses they will be studying GCSE Biology (AQA 8461), GCSE Chemistry (AQA 8462) and GCSE Physics (AQA 8463). This course will include the following topics;

Biology – 1 GCSE

Chemistry – 1 GCSE

Physics 1 GCSE

  • Cell biology
  • Organisation
  • Infection and response
  • Bioenergetics
  • Homeostasis and response
  • Inheritance, variation and evolution
  • Ecology
  • Key ideas

 

  • Atomic structure and the periodic table
  • Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter
  • Quantitative chemistry
  • Chemical changes
  • Energy changes
  • The rate and extent of chemical change
  • Organic chemistry
  • Chemical analysis
  • Chemistry of the atmosphere
  • Using resources
  • Energy
  • Electricity
  • Particle model of matter
  • Atomic structure
  • Forces
  • Waves
  • Magnetism and electromagnetism
  • Space physics (physics only)

 

 

Assessment

It is assessed by two, 1 hour and 45 minute exams in each of the subjects, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES

  • Explore and Learn Science Club
  • Science museum, discovering the Wonderlab trip
  • Science week

 LEARNING RESOURCES

 Social Sciences

Subject Lead – Ms Tahsin

There are three new subjects that pupils can study at KS4, which are all social sciences options.

Health and Social Care Tech Award (Edexcel 603/0395/5). Health and Social Care is a course designed for pupils with an interest in pursuing further education or a career in a health and/or social care setting such as nursing and childcare. It is vital that pupils have good communication skills and the ability to work independently as the course is predominantly coursework based which requires writing.

The Award gives learners the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. The main focus is on four areas of equal importance,

which cover the:

  • development of key skills that prove your aptitude in health and social care such as interpreting data to assess an individual’s health
  • process that underpins effective ways of working in health and social care, such as designing a plan to improve an individual’s health and wellbeing
  • attitudes that are considered most important in health and social care, including the
  • care values that are vitally important in the sector, and the opportunity to practise
  • applying them
  • knowledge that underpins effective use of skills, process and attitudes in the sector such as human growth and development, health and social care services, and factors affecting people’s health and wellbeing.

Assessment

  • Component 1 – Human lifespan development – internally assessed (30%)
  • Component 2 – Care services and values – internally assessed (30%)
  • Component 3 – Health and well-being – external exam (40%)

Psychology GCSE (Edexcel 1PS0) is another subject that pupils can choose to study in KS4. Psychology is a social science and studies the human mind and behaviour. Research in psychology seeks to understand and explain how we think, act, and feel. There are lots of types of psychology, including cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, biological psychology and social psychology that the Pearson course touches on. The course requires students to learn and understand psychological theories and studies and apply these to real scenarios as well as evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of them. There is also some math involved as students must know how to interpret and use data effectively.

The course gives an introduction into these different disciplines and covers seven topics:

  • Development
  • Memory
  • Psychological problems
  • The brain and neuropsychology
  • Social influence
  • Criminal psychology
  • Sleep and dreaming

Assessment

  • Paper 1 (55% of qualification). Written exam 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Paper 2 (45% of qualification). Written exam 1 hour 20 minutes

Sociology GCSE (AQA 8192) is an option to study in KS4. Sociology studies the structure and ‘functions’ of society. Pupils will develop a greater knowledge of how our modern society works: How we become the people we are; what influence nature has on us over our upbringing and the people around us (nurture). It is a chance to study and debate many of the current issues faced by society today, for example; poverty, inequality and welfare, education, crime, media, family and so on.

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

  • Social processes
  • Families
  • Education
  • Social structures
  • Social stratification
  • Crime and deviance

 

Assessment

Two written examination papers of 1 hour 45 minutes (each 50% of the qualification)

 

 

 

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